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Don Most – Even Happier Days for our Featured Artist.

Don Most at The Cutting Room in NYC

…I started off doing some jazz clubs out here in LA, and they went great.  I did some in New York before The Cutting Room, like 54 Below and Iridium jazz club. From there it just started growing in other parts of the country as well.

I cut a CD called “D Most Mostly Swinging,” with this great 18-piece band of wonderful Los Angeles jazz and studio musicians, studio musicians, and our great producer and trumpet player, William Ario.  And so that’s out. It’s been hard to grow because the live performance thing is almost impossible during COVID.

I’ve been dying to get back into doing live performance, more films and television. I just did a short film, which is called When George Got Murdered, and it’s a really interesting film about the George Floyd incident. I don’t know when that’s coming out, and I did some TV prior to that, a pilot called Puck Heads, where I play the owner of a minor league hockey team, so we’ll see what happens with that. Hopefully, that gets picked up. And I’m supposed to do a couple of other films that got put on hold.

Antiques and Auctions

Syl-Lee Antiques - 19th Century French Glass

…Adam: If 2020 has taught us anything, it is that the unfolding of life events can be utterly unpredictable. Even the best-laid plans for our personal well-being, for that of our families, and for our finances can abruptly, and dramatically, be altered almost overnight.  In the most stable of times, the management of our personal estates, or those of our parents, grandparents, or other loved ones, can appear intimidating, mysterious, and overwhelming.  In times of greater uncertainty, all of those feelings can be even more intense.  This is especially true when — as is often the case — estate issues arise because of unexpected life transitions or illness.  The good news is that understanding in advance the process of dealing with potentially valuable estate items, in particular antiques, can take a lot of the pressure off of managing an estate.  It can also put the estate owner or their heirs in the best possible position to see the financial benefits that can come with the successful liquidation of physical items in an estate, such as furniture, jewelry, and art.

Joseph D’Onofrio

Actor Joseph D'Onofrio

ALEX: Tell us about Gravesend?

JOSEPH: It’s a great show. It’s about the 1980s, early ’90s, in Brooklyn, New York. So if you were there in that era, you’re going to love the show. Gravesend season 1 is airing on Amazon Prime right now.  With actors William DeMeo, me, Paul Ben-Victor, Louis Lombardi, James Russo, and a great cast, that also includes Nick Turtorro and Peter Gaudio (a local Queens guy), it truly feels authentic. The show is unbelievably good, the cinematography, the story.

ALEX: Everybody now knows about it who didn’t know about it before. Our primary audience is Montauk to Manhattan with Brooklyn being very strong. I have already shared with the people on The Brooklyn Open, a Facebook page and group for artists. They’ll be thrilled that there’s something local for them to watch. I love to watch programs where I can say  “Hey, I grew up there.”

Distanced Learning For The Arts

Sandy Gennaro

…In the early days of quarantine, Sandy embarked on a quest to make virtual drumming lessons a reality. He loves his tried-and true-method of playing with his students using the two drum sets in his studio but found that adjusting the sound and synchronization over zoom was too great of a challenge. Instead, he provides a demonstration and discussion, then asks the student to play. Sandy tweaks the speaker and microphone settings so both he and the student are satisfied with the sound. …

Jan Guarino

…“The results from the video classes are in some ways better than in person classes. (Simultaneous demonstration and working time) pushes the students to try new things and to work faster,” says Jan. “I will continue to use this method of instruction in my classes when we can meet again in person. While nothing replaces actual in person classes – and I want to resume them as soon as possible – this has been a saving grace, not just for me but for of my students as well. Some of them were alone and feeling overwhelmed. It gave us all a sense of purpose and belonging. And I am so excited with the results!” …

Premiere Issue of Long Island Portfolio

Long Island Portfolio magazine publishers Alex M. Wolff and John Joseph Dowling, Jr. are thrilled to be able to support and showcase such great artists and their art in our first issue, Fall 2020. Enjoy the art and stories of Steven Calapai, Billy Mira, Maya Frank, Jeffrey Steele, EDward Steven Katz, Mike Gomes, Tony DeCaprio, Lenny Stucker, and our cover artist Robyn Bellospirito.

Long Island Portfolio magazine is on a mission to help artists of every kind promote themselves and their work from Montauk to Manhattan. We create great content to build and amplify artists social media presence. Nominate your favorite artist to be a Featured Artist and help improve their recognition and reach in our region.

In this issue we have painters, photographers, a jazz musician, country and rock singer song writer, and even stories around food, fashion, cars, cosplay and fantasy, with to poets!

Hillary Serota Needle

Long-Island-Portfolio-Montauk Morning Hillary Serota Needle 16x20 oil on canvas

As a self-taught emerging artist, my work in oils is reflective of architecture, flora, landscape and street scenes that I’ve photographed in my travels, especially during a trip to Ireland, however the beauty of Long Island offers unsurpassed opportunities to create. The serenity of the East End, whether it’s on one of the undulating sea shores or in a bright lavender field, brings me to the canvas. Butterflies and birds take …

Cover Artist Robyn Bellospirito

Long Island Portfolio Robyn Bellospirito

Robyn: Yes. My favorite shoot with you was in the woods because we did four different photo shoots in one. I felt free to be whatever it was I was feeling in the moment. I brought several costume changes that were easy where I could just throw something on over what I was wearing and it totally transformed it. Not only was I free to express myself through movement ’cause I do dance and art modeling and I’ll work that into it.

One of the greatest things I can receive as an artist is freedom to express myself. It’s always easy to work with you because you’re always open to my ideas and I could just emote. When I saw the photographs afterward, I looked at what you saw and you captured the angles, the moments when it felt very intense and expressive for me, and you captured these beautifully. Sometimes you would give minimal guidance, like what we got from the fairy shot that turned that into such magic.

I didn’t know what you were seeing and when I saw the finished work …

you did Photoshop to it, the green one where I’m reaching out… I could not have done that work on my own. I can be on my end and do my part, but I that collaboration is necessary in order for me to gain something much greater than myself that I couldn’t have done on my own.

Alex: If you look at the different photos that we’ve got, they’re very, very different they don’t even look like they’re from the same shoot or same session. It’s almost like you changed costume then the whole world changed around you. You used the term transformation before and it was just an amazing thing for me to capture. Then there are limitations when you’re in nature about what’s there, so there has to be in my eyes a capture process and for me, the capture starts with capturing who you are at peak moments of emotion and then trying to enhance that to tell the story. So the collaboration is ongoing and it continues from the time we decided we’re going to do a shoot.

Featured Artist Steven Calapai

Steven: To the art. Yeah, just make it happen. People fail to realize that there’s so many people in the world, talking about billions of people. So if you bring, let’s just say you bring a piece of art, you’re just starting out and you really love it and you bring it to a gallery and they hate it, it doesn’t mean that every gallery in the world hates it. And emerging artists today have a bigger advantage than I did growing up because they have the internet, which I didn’t have. Now, the internet’s everywhere. It can really help them to find out where to go and where to sell, which is so important.

Alex:  And that actually brings us to why Long Island Portfolio came about…

Steven: Yeah, what a great idea.

Alex: is because my work, my friend’s work, my daughter’s work, my wife’s work, nobody’s work is getting seen. Now, we live on Long Island, and we surround artists. They’re all over the place and we never see their work in some other places like the Art League of Huntington, and Huntington Art Council. But now that the galleries are closed, you can’t even go see somebody’s art. The museums are closed, and I thought that if I’m going to spend my time, and at this point in time of my life… I already help 25 or 30 different charities. I want to help artists get their work seen. Art needs to be seen. Art each it’s potential for everybody when it’s in somebody’s garage or hanging in their own home.

Steven:  Yeah. Very true.

Alex: You get to really make that difference in somebody’s life. If someone… If you could flip somebody emotionally, like your work does.

Steven:  That’s the whole idea. When you look at my art… And it happened to you, and it happens to everybody that looks at it. There’s so much to see and there are so many layers and sometimes you have to peel those layers back, look beyond the layers and see what’s really there. But there’s so much going on and in all of them, it’s just amazing. And art to me is something you could stare at and look at for hours and keep coming back to it and seeing something different every time you come back to it. So that’s what I create. And that’s basically what I do.

Alex: And your experience, actually, because your work is so different, and your influences are really across the board.

Steven:  Oh, absolutely. Yeah, Damien Hirst, big influence on me. Of course, Warhol, Jackson Pollock, love them. Absolutely.

Maya Frank – Featured Artist

AW: And I’m seeing something over there on the chair (referring to Maya’s paint pallet)

MF: Yeah, it is my, one of my tools. So I mix and match my paints and millions of brushes that I have – I draw, I paint, with anything that I see next to me. So, that could be an art piece as well –

AW: Yes, I was thinking that we’d photograph it and use that as part of the article.

MF: They actually have that in the city. They have like a big, I forgot what it’s called, they have a collection of… from the different artists –

AW: The palettes –

MF: The palettes from different artists, from, centuries, and they’re selling them as art pieces.

AW: I think they are. You want to hear a funny story, I went to Jackson Pollock’s house, are you familiar with Jackson Pollock? He does, he’s passed away quite a few years, but he did drip and splatter paintings. He lays canvas on the floor, and would spread his paint, and move it all over the place, and a lot of his paint would miss the canvas. So around the edges of the canvas, you’d have all this paint splatter. I made artwork by photographing his paint splatter.

MF: Oh, well that’s, that’s very interesting.

AW: It was awesome to see. What pieces are you working on now?

MF: Well, this I just finished. And I’m working on the piece ‘Medusa’ for past three years’ I believe. I wanted to bring character to it and thoughts. It’s still in my head.

AW: And I’ve noticed you have lots of black and white pieces as well as the color pieces.

Steele Rocks

Jeffrey Steele, if you don’t know him, is one of the greatest all-time country music song writers of all time. He writes on his own and on a commissioned basis for artists at all levels in the recording industry. Not only does he write, he produces, and platinum frequently comes from his efforts. Wikipedia lists more than 60 songs written by, just through the letter I. Even if you don’t follow country music, you have heard his songs sung by Cher, Rascal Flatts, Billy Ray Cyrus, Brooks and Dunn, John Travolta, Montgomery Gentry, Zac Brown and Jimmy Buffet, to name a few.

But anyway, the sound test ends, nobody else gets on stage, and Jeffrey starts playing and singing. Almost all rock, we all know the bands, but in his own way. After all, when it is one guitar player who is also the singer, he has total control. He played a few songs he authored but made famous by others, such as Love Somebody and What Hurts The Most, a number one song for Rascal Flatts.