Category: Long Island Portfolio Magazine

Maya Frank – Featured Artist

AW: And I’m seeing something over there on the chair (referring to Maya’s paint pallet)

MF: Yeah, it is my, one of my tools. So I mix and match my paints and millions of brushes that I have – I draw, I paint, with anything that I see next to me. So, that could be an art piece as well –

AW: Yes, I was thinking that we’d photograph it and use that as part of the article.

MF: They actually have that in the city. They have like a big, I forgot what it’s called, they have a collection of… from the different artists –

AW: The palettes –

MF: The palettes from different artists, from, centuries, and they’re selling them as art pieces.

AW: I think they are. You want to hear a funny story, I went to Jackson Pollock’s house, are you familiar with Jackson Pollock? He does, he’s passed away quite a few years, but he did drip and splatter paintings. He lays canvas on the floor, and would spread his paint, and move it all over the place, and a lot of his paint would miss the canvas. So around the edges of the canvas, you’d have all this paint splatter. I made artwork by photographing his paint splatter.

MF: Oh, well that’s, that’s very interesting.

AW: It was awesome to see. What pieces are you working on now?

MF: Well, this I just finished. And I’m working on the piece ‘Medusa’ for past three years’ I believe. I wanted to bring character to it and thoughts. It’s still in my head.

AW: And I’ve noticed you have lots of black and white pieces as well as the color pieces.

Featured Artist: Lenny Stucker

My career led to television.  I worked for NBC and I advanced quickly. I became the youngest director at NBC, and I directed Super Bowls and major events.  I had a wonderful career, very exciting, a lot of creativity. When I retired, I felt a tremendous void of a creative outlet, so I got back into my photography. I sit on the Commission of Suffolk County film Commission, where one of the other people, an owner of East Hampton TV,  invited me to come out to East Hampton and watch their televised productions, which were major events such as Polo matches, and the Hampton Classic which is a horse show.

I started doing photography at these events just for the fun of it because I was already retired.  I wasn’t looking for another career, but from 12 years old, photography was my love.

The Jazz Man Cometh – Tony DeCaprio

Long-Island-Portfolio-Tony-DeCaprio

It was pretty bizarre when I went back to Vegas, you know, because I started getting a name for myself, and then that’s when, not too long after that, I got the gig at the Hilton orchestra. I stayed there a good eight years and on the band was James Moody, tenor player, phenomenal player, became like a father image to me, also. Carl Fontana, the great trombone player one of the best in the world if not the best in the world, Sam Noto to a great trumpet player coming out of Stan Kenton, Alex Acuna was on the band for a little while. He later went with Weather Report. It was a phenomenal band, phenomenal, some other players perhaps you had never heard of. We did all the TV shows there because they did them at the Hilton. So I got experience with television work.

Alex:  and relying on the ability to read and play nice with others.

Tony:  You have to read, you know, because the pressure is on.  I became a good reader on the gig and when I had some spots in my reading that I had to work on I would go into LA on my day off and study. I studied with Joe Valenti who was orchestra leader at the LA Philharmonic as he was teaching sight reading to old studio guys, whatever little glitches, and you know the things they had to like, brush up on.  He really helped me a lot.

Alex: It sounds like you were constantly looking to improve and learn from everyone you were exposed to.  It’s great that you share those lessons with your students.  Were there any special techniques developed along the way?

Tony:  I have a picking technique that comes from the violin.

I studied with this picking genius at right hand plectrum technique because he was initially a violinist. He went way back to working with the old Paul Whiteman Orchestra and Eugene Ormandy.  He was a violinist before the guitar was popular, his name was Joe Sgro.

Super Exciting Work

Earlier this week my friend Adam Zimmerman of Syl-Lee Antiques put me in touch with a mutual contact that is a leader in the art auction world. I was in East Meadow at World Auction Gallery where I was hired to take photos to help authenticate a large painting that was recently found in a warehouse in New York City.

Even though the piece was signed by the artist, World Auction Gallery partner Ben Nejat is having the piece authenticated so his client can get the maximum value of the sale, and the buyer has 100 percent confidence that the painting is indeed an original.

I was thrilled to be in front of an unknown work of a popular artist. I am honored to be entrusted with a critical, but by no means final step of the authenticity certification process. After finding the art, photographs are the next step. Details need to be captured as accurately as possible as they are vital for authentication.

Art Destination Long Island

Jackson Pollock Barn Floor Splatter by Alex M Wolff

Known for a special quality of light especially on the East End, Long Island has always been home to great and famous artists. Some of those artists were born and raised here, others were transient, coming here seasonally for the light or social life. The Hamptons still host artists of all kinds.

Long Island Portfolio Covers

Live Performance Orestes by Alex M Wolff

I WANT THE COVER! Almost every call I pick up for Long Island Portfolio, from an artist or their agent, gallery owner, clothing designer or restaurant owner, starts with those words. I am not sorry to say, the cover is not for sale. Each issue of LI Portfolio is dedicated to timely themes. Art for the cover should be attention grabbing…

Premier Issue

Long Island Portfolio Media Kit

We surround people with talent and vision but are often unable to see or experience for ourselves because it is buried in basements, towns and cities, churches and vfw halls, and even on street corners. I believe he is back in school in Virginia, but singer and performing artist Finnbar Mac (Finn MacDevitt) can be seen busking around Huntington with his guitar case open for donations. I want to see him on stage at The Paramount and hear his music on Spotify.
Our first cover is graced with local artist Robyn Bellospirito. Robyn, all by herself represents painters and dancers and photographers, models, costume designers and character creators. We have collaborated on several projects and she shares the collaborative effort, joint art design. I forgot to mention she also sings and creates music.  I would love to help get her story and work in front of a greater audience and help her sell her work. Wouldn’t you? She is so creative, imagine she could devote her time to her artistic expression and not her day job (which is also creative, as she is a writer)